Fatty Liver Diet | MASLD: How To Eat For A Healthy Liver

Whether you have fatty liver disease or not, the fatty liver diet recommendations in this article can help you keep your liver in optimal health.


Tucked away in your upper right side is your liver, one of your body’s biggest and most hard-working organs.

Imagine it as a high-tech chemistry lab, working tirelessly behind the scenes to perform essential tasks. It removes toxins, manufactures vital substances like bile to aid digestion, and even helps regulate blood sugar levels.

Because the liver plays such a vital role, keeping it healthy is crucial for overall well-being.

regular coffee consumption may lower your risk of developing NAFLD

The good news is this: there’s a lot you can do to support your liver function, and it all starts with what you put on your plate and perhaps even in your cup!

This article will guide you through dietary choices that promote a healthy liver, including some surprising beverage options.


Short on Time? Here Is A Fatty Liver Diet Quick Summary

The latest guidelines on the management of fatty liver, including recommended foods and those to avoid for a fatty liver diet, were released in June 2024. They recommend following a Mediterranean diet, minimizing processed meats, ultra-processed foods, and sugar-sweetened beverages. Furthermore, they encourage increasing unprocessed or minimally processed foods. [22]

In addition, incorporating the following specific foods rich in beneficial nutrients can further support your liver health.

Fueling Your Liver: Top Food Choices for a Fatty Liver Diet

  • Coffee: Regular consumption may lower risk of fatty liver disease. [4]
  • Leafy Greens (Spinach): High in nitrates and polyphenols, which may help prevent fat accumulation in the liver. [5] Consume raw for maximum benefit.
  • Broccoli: May help the liver break down fats faster, reducing buildup. [6]
  • Beans and Soy: Packed with fiber and may lower risk of fatty liver disease. [8]
  • Soy and Whey Protein: May reduce fat buildup in the liver. [7] [21]
  • Fatty Fish (Salmon, Sardines, Tuna, Trout): Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which can improve liver function by reducing fat storage and boosting good cholesterol. [9]
  • Omega-3 Plant Sources: Sources of plant-based omega-3 like flaxseeds, chia seeds, and walnuts are beneficial for liver health. [10]
  • Whole Grains (Oatmeal): High in fiber, which may help manage fatty liver disease and reduce triglycerides. [11] [23]
  • Nuts: Linked to reduced inflammation, improved insulin sensitivity, and lower risk of fatty liver disease. [12]
  • Turmeric: High doses of curcumin (active ingredient) may help reduce markers of liver damage. [13]
  • Sunflower Seeds: Natural source of vitamin E, often used in fatty liver treatment. [14]
  • Healthy Fats (Avocados, Olive Oil, Nut Butter): Swap saturated fats for these unsaturated fats to support liver health. [15]
  • Garlic: Studies suggest garlic powder supplements may help reduce body weight and fat in people with fatty liver. [16]
  • Green Tea: Rich in antioxidants that may a therapeutic potential in fatty liver. [17][23][24]

Foods to Limit or Avoid on a Fatty Liver Diet [1][3][7]

  • Refined Grains (White Bread, Pasta, Rice): Can cause blood sugar spikes and are linked to increased risk of metabolic syndrome.
  • Sugary Drinks and Added Sugars: Elevate blood sugar and contribute to fat storage in the liver.
  • Saturated and Trans Fats (Processed Foods, Fried Foods, Fatty Meats): Contribute to fat accumulation in the liver.
  • Fatty, Fried Foods: Calorie-dense and promote weight gain, a risk factor for fatty liver disease.
  • Red Meat and Processed Meats: Saturated fats can increase fat storage around organs like the liver.
  • Sodium (Salt): Excessive intake increases risk of fatty liver disease. [18]
  • Alcohol: Excessive consumption is a major culprit in liver damage.

This guide provides a foundation for managing liver health through your diet. Scientific evidence and the latest findings on liver health support these recommendations.

Keep reading to explore the science behind these choices and understand how these foods can influence the health of your liver.


The Liver: The Powerhouse Within

The liver is truly a remarkable organ. Unlike many others, it has the incredible ability to regenerate itself after injury [1]. It’s constantly working behind the scenes, filtering out toxins and producing bile, a greenish-yellow fluid that breaks down fats for digestion.

However, unhealthy lifestyle habits can negatively impact this vital organ.


Understanding Fatty Liver Disease (MASLD)

Before we delve into the world of liver-loving foods, let’s address a common liver condition: Fatty Liver disease (technically named MASLD – Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease, and previously known as NAFLD – Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease).

Fatty liver (MASLD) occurs when excess fat accumulates in the liver cells, but unlike other liver problems, it isn’t caused by heavy alcohol consumption.

A healthy liver typically contains a small amount of fat. However, if the fat content surpasses 5-10% of the liver’s weight, it’s classified as a fatty liver or steatosis. This buildup can impair the liver’s ability to function effectively. [2]

Fortunately, Fatty Liver (MASLD) is often reversible through lifestyle changes, with a fatty liver diet playing a key role. [1]


Fatty Liver (MASLD) and MASH: Progression and the Role of a Fatty Liver Diet

Fatty liver (MASLD) can progress to a more serious condition called Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatohepatitis (MASH), previously known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). [2]

MASH occurs when the liver becomes overloaded with fat, leading to inflammation and potential scarring. [1] [2]

Imagine the liver cells as tiny factories. With fatty liver (MASLD), excess fat starts accumulating in these factories, hindering their ability to function properly. Over time, this overload triggers inflammation, similar to how your body might react to an injury. If left unchecked, this inflammation can lead to scarring of the liver cells, a condition known as fibrosis.

The severity of scarring determines the stage of MASH. Encouragingly, both fatty liver (MASLD) and the early stages of MASH can often be reversed through lifestyle modifications, with diet being a critical factor.

Studies have shown that weight loss as low as 5-7% for fatty liver (MASLD) and 7-10% for MASH can significantly improve liver function and potentially reverse the condition. [1] [2]

However, if scarring progresses to cirrhosis, the damage becomes permanent. Cirrhosis severely limits the liver’s ability to function and increases the risk of liver cancer. In severe cases, a liver transplant may be necessary.

This highlights the importance of early intervention. While fatty liver disease (MASLD) can sometimes progress to MASH, a healthy fatty liver diet can help prevent this in many cases.


Fatty Liver (MASLD) on the Rise: A Call for Action

Here’s a startling fact: fatty liver (MASLD) has rapidly become the most common liver disease globally and in 2023 was estimated to affect 38% of the global population. [20]

Even more concerning is that fatty liver (MASLD) has become the most common form of liver disease in children, and its prevalence has more than doubled in the past two decades. [2]

The rising prevalence of fatty liver disease (MASLD) highlights the importance of preventative measures, and a healthy fatty liver diet is a powerful tool in this fight.


Who’s at Risk for Fatty Liver (MASLD)?

While fatty liver (MASLD) can affect anyone, certain factors increase your risk of developing it. Let’s explore these risk factors: [1] [2]

  • Overweight or Obesity: Excess body fat, particularly around the abdomen, contributes to increased fat storage in the liver.
  • Diabetes: People with diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, are more prone to fatty liver (MASLD).
  • High Cholesterol: Abnormal cholesterol levels, particularly high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and low HDL (“good”) cholesterol, can increase fatty liver (MASLD) risk.
  • High Triglycerides: Elevated triglycerides, a type of blood fat, are another risk factor for fatty liver (MASLD).
  • Metabolic Syndrome: This cluster of conditions, including obesity, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, and abnormal blood fat levels, significantly increases fatty liver (MASLD) risk.
  • Rapid Weight Loss: While weight loss is generally beneficial for overall health, rapid or crash diets can stress the liver and potentially contribute to fatty liver (MASLD).
  • Poor Diet: A diet consistently high in processed foods, sugary drinks, and unhealthy fats can promote MASLD development.
  • Certain Medications: Some medications may have side effects that increase liver fat storage.

It’s important to note that fatty liver (MASLD) can occur even in individuals without these typical risk factors. However, being aware of these factors allows you to make informed dietary choices that promote liver health.


The Liver-Heart Connection: A Double Threat and How a Fatty Liver Diet Can Help

Understanding Cholesterol

Fatty liver (MASLD) and heart disease share a common enemy: metabolic syndrome. [2]

As mentioned earlier, metabolic syndrome significantly increase the risk of both fatty liver (MASLD) and heart disease.

Metabolic syndrome is diagnosed when someone has three or more of these risk factors: [19]

  • High blood glucose (sugar)
  • Low levels of HDL (“good”) cholesterol in the blood
  • High levels of triglycerides in the blood
  • Large waist circumference or “apple-shaped” body
  • High blood pressure

The underlying causes of these conditions are often similar, such as unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and genetics. This creates a double threat for individuals with fatty liver (MASLD), as they are more susceptible to developing heart problems as well.

While liver complications from fatty liver (MASLD) are a concern, current medical recommendations emphasize discussing the fatty liver (MASLD) / heart disease connection with your doctor. Statistics show that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a more common cause of death than liver failure among people with fatty liver (MASLD). Even in cases where fatty liver (MASLD) progresses to significant scarring (cirrhosis), the risk of CVD remains higher. [2]

This highlights the importance of a comprehensive approach to managing fatty liver (MASLD). By addressing the underlying risk factors through dietary changes, exercise, and potentially medication if prescribed by your doctor, you can significantly improve your overall health and reduce the risk of both liver and heart disease.

The fatty liver diet promotes heart health alongside improved liver function. By following these dietary recommendations, you can reduce your risk of both conditions.


Silent Threat: Recognizing Fatty Liver (MASLD) and MASH Symptoms

Fatty liver (MASLD) often goes undetected because it frequently presents with no symptoms. However, as the condition progresses to MASH (Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatohepatitis), some signs may emerge.

Here’s a breakdown of potential symptoms: [2]

  • Fatty liver (MASLD): Extreme tiredness (fatigue), weakness, and discomfort or pain in the upper right abdomen are some possible indicators. It’s important to note that these symptoms can be caused by other conditions as well.
  • MASH: In advanced stages, MASH may present with more noticeable symptoms, including jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), severe itching, fluid buildup in the abdomen (ascites), and swelling in the ankles (edema). In some cases, mental confusion may also occur.

If you experience any of these symptoms, particularly if you have risk factors for fatty liver (MASLD), it’s crucial to consult your doctor for a proper diagnosis and discuss potential treatment options.


Diagnosing Fatty Liver (MASLD): Early Detection is Key

Fatty liver (MASLD) diagnosis often begins with a routine blood test. Elevated liver enzyme levels can be a potential indicator. However, other factors can also cause these levels to rise. Therefore, doctors will typically rule out other possibilities before confirming fatty liver (MASLD).

This process may involve reviewing your medical history and potentially ordering additional tests, such as: [1] [2]

  • Ultrasound: This painless imaging test uses sound waves to create a picture of your liver, revealing any abnormalities in size or structure.
  • Liver Biopsy: In some cases, a liver biopsy, where a small tissue sample is extracted for analysis, may be necessary to determine the severity of liver damage.

Preventing Fatty Liver (MASLD): Fatty Liver Diet And Lifestyle Choices

Empowering Your Liver Through Food Choices

Fatty Liver Diet: The healthiest carbs are whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and legumes

The encouraging aspect of fatty liver (MASLD) is that it’s largely preventable and even reversible in its early stages.

The key weapon in your fight for optimal liver health? Your diet!

With the fatty liver diet recommendations below, you can significantly improve your liver health and reduce your risk of fatty liver (MASLD). [1] [2]

  • Maintain a Healthy Weight: Being overweight or living with obesity are major risk factors for fatty liver (MASLD). Excess body fat, particularly around the abdomen, contributes to increased fat storage in the liver. Focusing on weight management through healthy eating and regular exercise can significantly reduce your fatty liver (MASLD) risk.
  • Embrace a Balanced Plate: Fill your meals with lean protein sources like fish, poultry, beans, and lentils is key in a fatty liver diet. Opt for whole grains over refined ones, and prioritize colorful fruits and vegetables. Healthy fats from sources like avocados, nuts, seeds, and olive oil are your friends. Include low-fat dairy products for a well-rounded dietary approach.
  • Move Your Body: Regular physical activity is essential for overall health, including liver function. Aim for most days of the week to incorporate some form of movement, even if it’s just brisk walking. Consult your doctor for guidance on activities suitable for your fitness level.
  • Limit Alcohol: Excessive alcohol consumption is a significant risk factor for liver damage. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation.
  • Medication with Caution: Certain medications can have side effects that impact the liver. Always discuss medications with your doctor and follow the prescribed dosage carefully.

Learn more:

Understanding the Impact of Carbs on a Fatty Liver Diet

The role of carbohydrates in fatty liver (MASLD) development deserves a closer look. High glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates, found in abundance in sugary drinks, processed snacks, and refined grains, are readily converted by the liver into fat. This excess fat can accumulate in the liver, contributing to fatty liver (MASLD).

In contrast, lower GI carbohydrates, like those found in whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are broken down more slowly by the body, leading to steadier blood sugar levels and reduced stress on the liver.

By making mindful choices about carbohydrates and embracing a balanced, nutrient-rich fatty liver diet, you can empower your liver and promote optimal health. [1]

Learn more:


Treating Fatty Liver (MASLD): Can a Fatty Liver Diet Help?

Supporting Your Liver Through Treatment and Beyond

Although there are currently no medications specifically approved for fatty liver (MASLD), significant progress can still be made through lifestyle changes. Let’s explore treatment strategies: [22] [1][2][3]

  • Weight Management: This remains the cornerstone of fatty liver (MASLD) treatment. Losing even 5-10% of your body weight can significantly improve liver function and potentially reverse the early stages of MASH. A gradual approach through healthy eating and exercise is recommended for sustainable weight loss.
  • Dietary Modifications: The dietary strategies outlined in the previous section form the foundation for a fatty liver diet. Reducing calorie intake, limiting unhealthy fats and sugars, and prioritizing whole grains, lean protein, fruits, vegetables, and healthy fats are all crucial aspects of managing fatty liver (MASLD) through diet.
  • Exercise Integration: Paired with a fatty liver diet, regular physical activity plays a vital role in managing fatty liver (MASLD). Exercise helps with weight management, improves insulin sensitivity, and reduces inflammation, all of which benefit liver health. Aim for more than 150 min/week of moderate- or more than 75 min/week of vigorous-intensity physical activity.
  • Limiting Or Abstaining From Alcohol Is Crucial: The liver is responsible for processing alcohol. If you have fatty liver (MASLD), alcohol consumption can contribute to further damaging your liver. To promote liver health and prevent further complications from fatty liver (MASLD), it’s crucial to discuss your individual situation with your doctor to determine the safest approach regarding alcohol consumption.
  • Medication Management: In some cases, your doctor may prescribe medications to address specific health conditions associated with fatty liver (MASLD), such as diabetes, or high blood pressure or cholesterol. It’s important to follow your doctor’s recommendations for medications and dosages.

Learn more:

Fatty Liver Diet: Powering Your Liver for Optimal Health

Control blood sugar naturally and enjoy your meals

Now that we understand the importance of dietary choices for liver health, let’s delve into the specifics of the fatty liver diet, exploring what to eat for optimal liver function, especially if you have fatty liver (MASLD) or MASH.

Embracing a Balanced Plate [3]

  • Fruits and Vegetables: Fill your plate with a vibrant rainbow of these nutritional powerhouses. They are brimming with antioxidants and essential vitamins that help protect your liver from damage.
  • Fiber-Rich Choices: Incorporate plenty of high-fiber plant-based foods like legumes (beans, lentils) and whole grains (brown rice, quinoa, whole-wheat bread) into your diet. Fiber helps regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, reducing stress on the liver.
  • Lean Protein Sources: Choose lean protein sources like fish, poultry, beans, and lentils. These provide essential nutrients for repair and regeneration, processes crucial for liver health.
  • Healthy Fats: Not all fats are created equal. Include healthy fats from sources like avocados, nuts, seeds, and olive oil in your diet. These fats play a vital role in various bodily functions and can even improve liver function.

Learn more:

Power Up Your Plate for Optimal Liver Health

In addition to the foundational dietary strategies outlined previously, incorporating specific foods rich in beneficial nutrients can further support your liver health.

Let’s explore some powerhouses to add to your plate [3][7]:


regular coffee consumption may lower your risk of developing NAFLD

Coffee: Enjoy your morning cup of coffee guilt-free! Studies suggest that regular coffee consumption may lower your risk of developing fatty liver (MASLD) and even reduce liver fibrosis progression in those already diagnosed. [4] Consider including it as part of your fatty liver diet.


spinach

Leafy Greens: Embrace the vibrant world of vegetables! Spinach, in particular, may help prevent fat accumulation in the liver due to its nitrate and polyphenol content. Focus on consuming spinach raw to maximize its benefits. [5]


Green foods are rich in cancer-blocking chemicals like sulforaphane, isothiocyanates, and indoles, which inhibit the action of carcinogens (cancer-causing compounds).

Broccoli: This cruciferous vegetable shows promise for liver health. Studies suggest it may help the liver break down fats faster, reducing their buildup. Include broccoli in your stir-fries, steam it for a side dish, or roast it with olive oil and spices for a flavorful treat. [6]


tofu

Beans and Soy: These versatile ingredients offer a double whammy of benefits. They’re packed with fiber and may help lower your risk of fatty liver (MASLD). [8]


Soy and whey protein: A 2019 review in the journal Nutrients found that soy and whey protein reduced fat buildup in the liver. [7] [21]

fish foods

Fish: Fatty fish like salmon, sardines, tuna, and trout contain omega-3 fatty acids. Research suggests these can improve liver function by reducing fat storage and boosting good cholesterol levels. [9]


Chia seeds

Omega-3 Plant Sources: While fish are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, there are also plant-based options! Consider incorporating these into your diet [10]:

  • Flaxseeds: These tiny seeds are powerhouses of omega-3s. Enjoy them ground up in smoothies, oatmeal, or sprinkled on salads.
  • Chia seeds: Another tiny but mighty source of omega-3s, chia seeds can be enjoyed similarly to flaxseeds.
  • Walnuts: These nuts are not only good for brain health, but they’re also a source of omega-3s.

Whole grains examples and why they are healthy

Whole Grains: Load up on fiber-rich whole grains like oatmeal. Studies show they may help manage fatty liver (MASLD) and reduce triglyceride levels. [11] [23]


Snack Smarter for Blood Sugar Balance

Nuts: Reaching for a handful of nuts is a smart choice for liver health. Nuts are linked to reduced inflammation, improved insulin sensitivity, and a lower risk of fatty liver (MASLD). Walnuts, in particular, have been shown to improve liver function tests in people with fatty liver (MASLD) disease. [12]


Turmeric

Turmeric: This vibrant spice may offer powerful liver benefits. High doses of curcumin, its active ingredient, may help reduce markers of liver damage [13]. To enhance curcumin absorption, consider consuming turmeric with black pepper, which contains piperine that can significantly boost bioavailability.


sunflower seeds

Sunflower Seeds for Vitamin E: Nature’s source of vitamin E, sunflower seeds are a tasty way to boost your antioxidant intake. Vitamin E is often used in fatty liver (MASLD) treatment [14], and sunflower seeds provide a natural way to increase your levels.


Discover why healthy fats are great for your body

Healthy Fats: Swap out saturated fats for unsaturated fats like those found in avocados, olive oil, nut butter, and fatty fish. This is a key principle of the Mediterranean diet, which is recommended for managing fatty liver (MASLD). [15][22]


The onion family contains allicin, which has anti-tumor properties. Other foods in this group contain antioxidant flavonoids like quercetin and kaempferol.

Garlic: This flavorful addition to your meals may offer more than just taste. Studies suggest garlic powder supplements may help reduce body weight and fat in people with fatty liver (MASLD). [16]


Green tea

Green Tea: Green tea is rich in antioxidants called catechins, which studies suggest may a therapeutic potential in fatty liver (MASLD). [17][23][24] Enjoy a cup of green tea throughout the day to reap its potential benefits.


Foods to Limit to Optimize Liver Health [1][3][7]

  • Refined Grains: White bread, pasta, and rice are stripped of fiber during processing, causing blood sugar spikes. Studies suggest a link between higher refined grain intake and metabolic syndrome, a risk factor for various health issues including liver health. Opt for whole grains or legumes instead as part of your fatty liver diet.
  • Sugary Drinks and Added Sugars: Added sugars found in candy, pastries, sodas, and processed foods can elevate blood sugar levels and contribute to fat storage in the liver. Fructose and corn syrup are also culprits, so be mindful of these hidden sugars.
  • Saturated and Trans Fats: Processed foods, fried foods, and fatty meats are often high in unhealthy saturated and trans fats. These fats contribute to fat accumulation in the liver and can worsen fatty liver (MASLD). It’s best to limit saturated fats and avoid trans fats whenever possible.
  • Fatty, Fried Foods: These foods are often calorie-dense and can contribute to weight gain, a common precursor to fatty liver (MASLD). Flavor your food with herbs and spices instead of excess salt, and choose baking or steaming over frying whenever possible.
  • Red Meat and Processed Meats: Saturated fats found in red meat and processed meats like deli meats can increase fat storage around organs, including the liver. Limit these options and choose lean protein sources like fish, tofu, or tempeh. Opt for wild, oily fish when possible for the added benefit of omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Sodium (Salt): Excessive sodium intake independently increases the risk of fatty liver (MASLD). [18] Reduce added table salt and processed meats, which are often high in sodium. Focus on using herbs and spices to add flavor to your dishes.
  • Alcohol: Excessive alcohol consumption is a major culprit in liver damage. As mentioned earlier, to promote liver health and prevent further complications from fatty liver (MASLD), it’s crucial to discuss your individual situation with your doctor to determine the safest approach regarding alcohol consumption.

Learn more:


References

[1] Baylor College of Medicine | NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE: A GUIDE TO WHAT & HOW TO EAT

[2] American Liver Foundation | Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

[3] Fatty Liver Diet: What Foods to Eat and What Foods to Avoid (healthline.com)

[4] The effect of coffee consumption on the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver fibrosis: A meta-analysis of 11 epidemiological studies – PubMed (nih.gov)

[5] Spinach consumption and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease among adults: a case–control study – PMC (nih.gov)

[6] Broccoli ameliorate NAFLD by increasing lipolysis and promoting liver macrophages polarize toward M2-type – ScienceDirect

[7] Fatty liver diet: Foods to eat and avoid (medicalnewstoday.com)

[8] Food and Nutrition in the Pathogenesis of Liver Damage – PMC (nih.gov)

[9] Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis – PMC (nih.gov)

[10] A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to evaluate plant-based omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patient biomarkers and parameters – PubMed (nih.gov)

[11] Whole-grain consumption and its effects on hepatic steatosis and liver enzymes in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a randomised controlled clinical trial – PubMed (nih.gov)

[12] Association between nut consumption and non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease in adults – Zhang – 2019 – Liver International – Wiley Onl ine Library

[13] Does turmeric/curcumin supplementation improve serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials – PubMed (nih.gov)

[14] Vitamin E has a beneficial effect on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials – PubMed (nih.gov)

[15] Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and NAFLD in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: The FLIPAN Study – PMC (nih.gov)

[16] Therapeutic Effects of Garlic on Hepatic Steatosis in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial – PMC (nih.gov)

[17] Salubrious Effects of Green Tea Catechins on Fatty Liver Disease: A Systematic Review – PMC (nih.gov)

[18] Role of high-salt diet in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a mini-review of the evidence | European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (nature.com)

[19] What is Metabolic Syndrome? | American Heart Association

[20] Changing epidemiology, global trends and implications for outcomes of NAFLD – Journal of Hepatology (journal-of-hepatology.eu)

[21] Impact of Nutritional Changes on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease – PMC (nih.gov)

[22] EASL–EASD–EASO Clinical Practice Guidelines on the management of metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD) – Journal of Hepatology (journal-of-hepatology.eu)

[23] Precision Nutrition in NAFLD: Effects of a High-Fiber Intervention on the Serum Metabolome of NAFD Patients—A Pilot Study – PMC (nih.gov)

[24] Therapeutic potential of green tea in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease | Nutrition Reviews | Oxford Academic (oup.com)

[25] The Effect of Green Tea Extract Supplementation on Liver Enzymes in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease – PMC (nih.gov)

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Regular coffee consumption may lower your risk of developing MASLD